Apocalyptic, Book Review, Dystopia, dystopian, Zombies

Prescient by DS Murphy

My Rating: 4/5 Stars

Summary via Amazon: “What if I told you you’d be dead in a year? That a food corporation would experiment with genetic modification, and nearly destroy the human race. Would you believe me? Sounds crazy, right? Because nobody can see the future. Nobody but me. And what I see isn’t pretty. A dystopian wasteland. Bodies rotting to nothing in the streets. Humans on the brink of survival. The wilderness eating away at what used to be my hometown. A shadow organization rounding up children. Bands of warring tribes. And let’s not forget the modifieds – the zombie-like remains of what used to be the human race…

My Review: I loved everything about this story except the ending. It was perfect; the pace was great, keeping me engaged up until the mini-cliffhanger. I despise cliffhangers, even if it is trying to pull you into a second book. I suppose the overall conflict of this first book was wrapped up by the end, so that makes up for it. But, I felt it ended too abruptly for me to feel satisfied. I’m left with this urge to keep reading, but the irritation of how the first ended… it’s all very conflicting. 

That being said, the world building was great, the backstory and explanations didn’t get in the way of the action or dialogue. 

The beginning was a bit too slow. Starting the story with the teens sitting around the room smoking might have been a better way to go. There was a lack of build-up to this moment, and it didn’t keep me engaged as much as the rest of the book did. Throwing me right into the tension, conflict, and then suddenly–woah, something strange is happening–would have hooked me in quicker. 

I’m not sure what I feel about the protagonist. There are so many questions left unanswered in this book, I’m kind of frustrated with her by the end. She’s been told exactly what she needs to do to stop the apocalypse from happening, but is in denial or scared and won’t do it–even though she’s consistently looking for a way to fix the future. It’s in front of her, handed to her. So, she’s whining to/about, and frustrated with, her side characters, her sister, and herself, looking for a way to fix things, but refuses to do the one thing that will. This drags on, and it’s maddening. It makes her a little weak, in my opinion. I know she’s just a kid still, but she doesn’t have a choice at this point. 

Time traveling books are really irritating sometimes, especially if things are on a loop–a paradox. I’ve never been a huge fan of time travel (this excludes historical fiction), but this book made it a little more intriguing and unique. The reason behind the apocalypse was also unique–at least, I’ve never read anything like this before, so overall, I enjoyed it. 

Uncategorized, Zahra

Zahra: The Book of the Dead

My writing goal for June 2017 was 50k for my zombie fantasy story.
I’m excited to announce:
DRAFT 1 is COMPLETE!! FINALLY!!

I’m taking a break this month to work on a new WIP for CampNaNoWriMo,
but look forward to diving back into revisions in August!
Thanks for all your encouragement! I couldn’t have done it without you! ♥

 

Book Review, Fairytale, Re-Telling, Uncategorized, Zombies

Alice: The Wanderland Chronicles

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My Rating: 5/5 Heart

Kindle Verified Purchase

Short Summary: An Alice in Wonderland re-telling. Hoping she isn’t too late, Alice fights her way through deadly momerath territory to find a cure for her sister, who’s infected with the dreaded virus.

My Review: 

I love this cover so much and every page in between. I’m so excited I own the hard copy too. 
♥ A new spin on a classic favorite. Even better, it’s a zombie tale. “Momeraths,” so clever!
 Writing style, pacing, action, and tension kept me entertained and hooked.
♥ Other than the occasional lengthy dialogue from Abbott and Hatta, there were little-to-no interruptions in the pace of the story from start to finish.
 I love Alice, and Chess is my favorite character. He’s flighty, but for good reason. I’m looking forward to seeing how his character’s strengths and weaknesses help or hinder Alice in the next book. Alice is a strong character, who isn’t easily deterred from her mission to find the cure, even when the Red Queen double crosses her. 

Overall, I recommend this to re-telling and zombie lovers alike. It was a fun, fast paced, easy read with some clever references to the classic tale of Alice woven in. Five Red Hearts from me! Looking forward to Sullivan’s re-telling of Peter Pan next!

 

 

 

Apocalyptic, Book Review, Dystopia, Horror, Uncategorized, Zombies

Stage 3 by Ken Stark

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My Rating: 5/5 stars

Short Summary: Mason has lost his faith in humanity after a heart-wrenching breakup with Beck. As he returns from vacation, angry and alone, he confronts a world plagued by blindness, the first stage of zombie transformation. Forced from his home, he encounters a young girl, who gives him hope to fight on, for her sake if not his own.

My Warning: Don’t read this before bed, unless you plan on being up all night huddled under the covers in fear. 

I did just that. I don’t regret it at all, but still…I was terrified until the end.

I love zombies, and Ken Stark did a fantastic job of spinning his own horror story. He made Mason, an ultimately dis-likable character, likable. I’m so use to reading and watching zombie stories where the main pov character struggles to cope with the horror in front of them by cowering for the majority of the story before jumping into action and facing it head on. Mason did the opposite, and he’s smart. While he coped with loss and fear in his own way, he’s a strong character, who reacts realistically while also making quick decisions without hesitation. His redeeming qualities shine through as he protects a young blind girl, which makes him a sympathetic, caring character beneath his rough external personality and the internal conflicts he faces.

Spoiler ahead…

My only criticism: The overall point of the story is to show the ongoing struggle they face and the hope slowly slipping away from them, which is evident from how the book ends, but I was still disappointed that the characters didn’t succeed or fail in their main goal. Not meeting the goal is obviously part of the underlying theme of hope here, but still…I was left hanging, and I didn’t like it. It felt incomplete. Minus this disappointment, there were only a few places where the point of view switches in scene, which, for once, I didn’t mind so much. I thoroughly enjoyed this book. It was emotionally gripping with it’s fast pace. You won’t want to put it down. 

I read this for my own enjoyment, and highly recommend it.